Our Environment, Our Future

Overview

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History

A History of Construction to Create a Sustainable Future
 
Solel Boneh Infrastructure is the veteran of the companies in the Shikun & Binui Group. Founded in 1920 as The Public Works Office, the company has been operating as Solel Boneh since 1924. In the early days, the company acted as the operational arm of the Labor Union in the areas of construction and public works in Eretz Israel.
Alongside these activities, the company served as a vehicle for the absorption of new immigrants and for the professional training of many workers who came to Israel.
During the British Mandate period, the company carried out projects throughout the country. As a result of the economic crisis of the late 1920s, the company experienced many difficulties, but recovered and resumed operations in 1935. During the years of World War II, Solel Boneh Infrastructure constructed for the British authorities airports, roads, bridges and military camps in Eretz Israel, Egypt, Syria, Iraq, Cyprus, Iran and Bahrain.
During Israels War of Independence, the personnel of Solel Boneh Infrastructure built fortifications, laid water pipes, and transferred vital equipment and supplies to isolated settlements. Over the years of the massive immigration to Israel, the company focused on matters of high priority on the young States agenda. Solel Boneh Infrastructure teams built thousands of homes for the new immigrants and implemented a wide range of public and private works in the nascent country.
 
You can bring in butter from Australia that competes with our butter; you can bring in knitwear from England, but you cant bring in houses or roads from abroad
David Ben Gurion, 23 June 1944
 
 
Milestones in the Story of the State
 
Long before the establishment of the State, Shikun & Binui Solel Boneh Infrastructure carried out projects that serve as milestones in the history of the State of Israel.
 
Solel Boneh paved the way for the independence of Israel, including the construction of projects, milestones and landscapes that are an integral part of Israeli history:
Public buildings: The Israeli Knesset; the Israel Museum, Jerusalem; the Latrun Fortress; the government complex in Jerusalem; the International Conference Center in Jerusalem (Binyanei HaUma); the Tel Aviv Shalom Tower and Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial Museum in Jerusalem.
Infrastructure: the Rutenberg Power Station at Naharayim; the Reading Power Station in Tel Aviv; Rabin Lights Power Station in Hadera; the oil refineries in Haifa; Ashdod Port; Haifa Port; the reactor in Dimona.
Roads: Burma Road - the road connecting Jerusalem and Tel Aviv; the Ayalon Highway.
Hospitals: Hadassah Jerusalem; Tel Hashomer; the Rabin Hospital (Beilinson) in Petach Tikva; Rambam Hospital in Haifa; Soroka Hospital.
Universities: the Givat Ram and the Mount Scopus campuses of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Tel Aviv University (the main part); the Technion; University of Haifa (main part); the Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva (main part).
Hotels: Dan Carmel and Dan Panorama, Haifa; Dan Tel Aviv; David Intercontinental, Tel Aviv; King David, Jerusalem; Hilton Tel Aviv; Hilton Jerusalem; Sheraton Jerusalem; Hyatt Jerusalem; Hyatt Dead Sea; Club Hotel Eilat; Club Inn, Eilat; Moriah Eilat.
 
 

Latrun Fortress

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Latrun
Latrun Fortress
The British Mandate Administration commissioned the construction of the Latrun fortress following the Great Arab Uprising of 1936-1939 as a police station to control the road between Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. Following the Israel War of Independence (1948), the Fortress was under Jordanian rule until the Harel Brigade recaptured it in the Six-Day War.

Israel Museum

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Jerusalem
Israel Museum
The Israel Museum in Jerusalem was inaugurated in May 1965. Its various buildings are reminiscent of a Mediterranean village built of small units that blend into the landscape, yet have a strong Modernist influence. Of the buildings subsequently added, the Youth Wing and the Weisbord Pavilion are the most prominent.

The Knesset

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Jerusalem
The Knesset
Solel Boneh was the main contractor for the Knesset (Israels Parliament) building (1960-1966), including construction of the forecourt, the main plenary hall, lounges, committee boardrooms, a library, archives, a synagogue, cafeteria and MK chambers designed by Architect Joseph Klarwein. It was funded through a gift from the estate of Baron James de Rothschild.

King David Hotel

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Jerusalem
King David Hotel
The King David was built as a luxury hotel during the British Mandate at the initiative of the Mosseri family from Egypt. It has ever since been considered among the most prestigious of the countrys hotels and is Israels official accommodation for visiting world leaders and other VIP guests.

First Quarry

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Migdal Tzedek
First Quarry, Migdal Tzedek
Solel Bonehs first quarry was built in Migdal Tzedek (between Rosh Haayin and Elad, near Kibbutz Nachshonim). The first group of workers consisted of 11 men and women who had immigrated to Israel during the 3rd Aliya. In 1929, an additional quarry was built at the same location and the Migdal Tzedek Lime and Gravel Factories Ltd. company was established along with Stone & Lime Industries, Ltd (a subsidiary of Solel Boneh).

Power Station

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Naharayim
The Hydroelectric Power Station in Naharayim
The hydroelectric power station in Naharayim was built by Pinchas Rotenberg in order to utilize the waters of the Jordan and Yarmuk Rivers to supply electricity in Pre-State Israel and Transjordan. This plant was meant to be the first of four power stations that Rotenberg planned on establishing along the length of the Jordan Valley.
When referring to his choice of Solel Boneh workers to carry out the project, Rotenberg said: Where else can you find workers who are willing to strike if no one explains to them what they are building?

The Tel Aviv Port

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Tel Aviv
The Tel Aviv Port
The dream of a Hebrew port in the Land of Israel was born almost simultaneously with the birth of the city of Tel Aviv, when Jaffa port was the countrys main maritime gateway. Following the outbreak of the Great Arab Revolt in April 1936 and the Arab general strike that resulted in the closure of Jaffa port, there was growing public pressure on the British Mandate to end Tel Avivs economic dependency on Jaffa. On May 15, 1936, the British Mandate allowed food cargo to be unloaded onto the beaches of Tel Aviv. Within 24 hours, a road, a customs shed and a short wooden pier were built. On May 19, approximately one month after the 1936 revolt started, the Tel Aviv port was born when the first ship, the Chaterty, carrying a cargo of cement bags, anchored off the coast opposite the wooden pier.

The National Water Carrier

The National Water Carrier
The National Water Carrier is the main artery of Israels water grid and integrates most of the water plants in the country. The National Water Carrier allows efficient utilization of the water resources in Israel and the transport thereof from the rainy North through the center of the country and down to the dry Negev. The National Water Carrier begins in the Sea of Galilee and runs for approximately 130 kilometers. The initial plans to build the National Water Carrier were prepared prior to the establishment of the State, but it only became possible to design specific plans following 1948. In 1956, actual work on the Carrier began, and continued until the Carrier was inaugurated on June 10, 1964.